Posts Tagged ‘curriculum’

Junk Drawer Science

Junk Drawer Science is a new science curriculum company started by teachers with great resources for teachers.

Welcome to Junk Drawer Science: a result of years of frustration with the out-of-touch, and often-out-of date resources that have been available to us as teachers. We believe that it is time for a revolution in science education. The textbook should be relegated to its proper place. It should be a resource and no longer the focal point of our science classes!

Our mission is to provide engaging materials that stimulate learning in your students. We believe that science should not be expensive, and that the simplest lessons are often the most profound.

At the moment, they have three products available for purchase: a book full of great activities for middle and high school life science classes, a guide to using interactive notebooks in science class, and the game they created called “The Game of Evolution”.

I happen to teach with the Junk Drawer Science owners and can guarantee that their products are worth every penny. They have worked hard to develop curriculum and lesson tools that are effective in the classroom as well as easy to implement on a low (to non-existent) budget.

I guess that makes this a shameless plug: all in the name of providing the world with great teaching resources!

Unfortunately, they will not be at the NSTA conference in San Francisco, so for now, you will have to check them out online.

Fluids Unit

I started the fluids unit this week (I’m going shallow and wide with the curriculum so the kids can get exposed to as much as possible). For some reason, my kids love talking about and asking questions about buoyancy, Bernoulli, pressure, etc.

What is suprising me the most is that the kids who usually don’t pay attention or do their work are the ones most enthralled. And when I say enthralled, I mean interrupting class every 40 seconds to ask questions when they are usually talking with friends or resting their head on the desk. It’s baffling.

I have no clue what the reason is for the changes, but since it has been so successful, I figured I’d come up with something to share. Check back soon for a summary of the scaffolding I’ve provided them with over the last few days.. I hope it will help somebody!

My First Tears 9/29

Well, it happened. After 5 weeks of good days, today was not so great and my frustration boiled over to tears after the school day was over.

My freshman have been totally disrespectful. I don’t mind students being chatty, but they have been blatantly rude. After speaking with a veteran teacher, I started implementing some new classroom management tools. Only complicating the issue further, homecoming is this Saturday and it’s almost as important as prom here. Needless to say, even my best students are distracted. I’ve just got to figure out how to deal with it until next week.

Physics has been a challenge in an entirely different way. About half of my students are only just taking Algebra II, some are in Trig, and very few are in Calculus. I am actually excited that my kids are not the typical physics kids – I love that they are working hard to learn material that science education culture dictates is only for a certain group of elite students. However, I find myself stuck in that hard place trying to teach students the content dictated by the state when the state has left no wiggle room for students without certain math credits.

My school is only in its second year, so many of the issues we struggle with have to do with students, faculty, and administrators still settling in. The athletic teams are young, so most are not having winning seasons and the students refuse to be proud of a school that can not win. On the other hand, many students are in school because it is safer than home – gangs and drugs are a huge part of their community.

I am definitely not in an impossible situation. I know there is a solution out there; I just haven’t found my “sweet spot” when it comes to classroom management with the younger crowd.

Anywho – it’s spirit week and it’s been a blast:


CrAzY hAiR dAy!

I tried to be Ms Frizzle for nerd day, but the dress didn't quite work out.

Awesome 80s for Blast from the Past Day!

Excited for Super Hero Day tomorrow, homecoming assembly, and the homecoming football game! More to come…

Wiki-Teacher

Wiki-Teacher is a fabulous resource for all teachers, regardless of content area. It was actually started by my district, but has more users from outside of Nevada than not!

One of the great things about Wiki-Teacher is that it has lesson plans and ideas as well as videos to give you some ideas of how to implement certain strategies.

There’s not much else I can say since even just a little time exploring will get you hooked!

Homeschooling Science

I read a post by a homeschooling mom/friend this morning and her struggles with teaching science since she does not feel confident in her own identity as a scientist (this is assuming the definition of scientist is one who does or learns science). Last year they had a great experience with a local science co-op, but had a scheduling conflict this year, so they are on their own for science curriculum.

Her decisions with for curriculum and activities were actually exactly what I would have recommended. She has a homeschooling science curriculum that covers a wide variety of elementary school science topics. She also encourages her girls to find books at the library related to the topic they are studying and is constantly giving them writing prompts related to the topic. Without even realizing it, she is training her girls to be scientifically literate.

Her next step is to incorporate activities and experiments. When studying wind and weather, they made pinwheels and even created their own clouds .

MAKE YOUR OWN CLOUDS: In order to make your own clouds, melt some ice cubes in a pan and watch the steam that is created. Once you’ve got plenty of steam, hold another pan above the first and watch as the steam condenses. This is a great at-home simulation of cloud formation!

I encouraged her to check out the following websites for more ideas:

The internet is a fantastic resource and has so many great ideas!


Earth Science Week 2009

Happy Earth Science Week 2009!!!

For all sorts of cool resources, check out Teach Science and Math’s Resources Post.

Technology Resources for the Science Classroom

I’ve been collecting all sorts of different posts and links for neat internet and technology resources for the classroom. I hope they’re useful!

Can you tell I think Educational Technology Guy’s posts are terrific?